NOW AVAILABLE: _a ship on the line by Vincent A. Cellucci & Christopher Shipman and Love and Other Lethal Things by K. R. Copeland!

Please welcome our new Fiction Editor, Justin Herrmann, and congratulate Michelle Greenblatt and Jeremy Hight on their evolving roles at Unlikely! We are currently looking for a new Art Director. Interested in applying?

Recent Articles:

Four Sketches by Gary Panter
Jeremy Hight Interviews Gary Panter
Jeremy Hight Interviews Mark C. Marino
Jeremy Hight Interviews Austin Islam
Jeremy Hight Interviews Janice Lee
Jeremy Hight Interviews Mez Breeze
Three Visual Poems by Tom Cassidy
Five Visual Poems by Baron and Jukka-Pekka Kervinen
Five Visual Poems by Bela Grimm and Jukka-Pekka Kervinen
Ten Visual Poems by John M. Bennett and Jukka-Pekka Kervinen
Four Visual Poems by John M. Bennett
Two Visual Poems by John M. Bennett and Matthew Stolte
Two Visual Poems by John M. Bennett and Jim Leftwich
Forty-One Visual Poems by Jim Leftwich
Four Visualish Poems by Jefferson Hansen
Three Poems by Yuriy Tarnaswky
Three Visualish Poems by Vernon Frazer
Three Poems by Jeffrey Side
Three Poems by mark hartenbach
Three Edie Sedgwicks by Kyle Hemmings
Three Poems by Peter Marra
Three Poems by Michael McAloran
Three Poems by Billy Cancel
Two Poems by Jeff Harrison
Two Poems by Wendy Taylor Carlisle
Two Poems by Clare L. Martin
Two Poems by David Allen Sullivan
Two Poems by Anne Elezabeth Pluto
Two Poems by Jay Sizemore
Two Poems by L. Wayne Russell
Two Poems by Mark Young
Two Poems by Ndaba Sibanda
Two Poems by John M. Bennett
Feathers in da Sky: Poetry by Joe Balaz
Drawing Room: Poetry by Benjamin Bailey
A Day in Marble Hill: Poetry by Charles Clifford Brooks III
T'Shuva: Poetry by Alan Fyfe
So Say the Fundementalists: Poetry by Ally Malinenko
Selections from Statevillainy by K. R. Copeland
Righteousness in the Hour of Stupidity by Willis Gordon
The State of Literature by Nbada Sibanda
What We Could Do with a Postal Savings Bank by Ellen Brown
Brian McAfee on child fatalities from easily-treatable diseases
Dennis Weiser on the death of journalism
Jordan Flaherty on the trans community as part of the gay rights movement
Dead or Alive: Fiction by Alain Marciano
She's a Steal: Fiction by J. Donnelly
Two Short Stories by Elizabeth McGuire
Three Drawings by Randy Adams
Jeremy Hight interviews Randy Adams
Five Drawings by Vanessa Martinez
Two Short Movies by Matthijs Vlot
Three Short Movies by Talan Memmott
Jeremy Hight interviews Talan Memmott
Jeremy Hight interviews Daniel Rehn
Jeremy Hight interviews Beach Sloth


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Ethan has nowhere to go
a game by Johansen Quijano

Johansen Quijano's "Ethan has nowhere to go" is a full-length adventure computer game based on Jeremy Hight's story. It runs on PC-compatible computers, and is available free here at Unlikely Stories: Episode IV.


Download the game (415 megabytes)

Directions:
Download the .zip file and extract it to your computer. Recent versions of Windows can automatically extract .zip files, or you can download WinZip.
The .zip file will create a folder called "Ethan." In this folder is a file called "Game." Double-click "Game" to start the game.

Inside the game:
Use the arrow keys to move around.
Use the space bar to interact with objects.
If you get stuck in the first scene, try interacting with the mailbox and nearby shrubbery to proceed.


"Ethan Has Nowhere To Go" was a short story written by Jeremy Hight. It was about to be published when he pulled it. It will never be published. These solicited works are Ethan. These works are the story.

The text exists only to be used as a nameless trigger, as a bit of back end, like HTML code.


Johansen says, "For the creation of this game, I used the RMK XP game engine. I edited community assets, including Shokaizer's character templates and Zanyzora's world tiles, using Paint.Net to create a world reminiscent of the 16-bit era of gaming. I used the engine's collision detection system to make sure that sprites would not overlap, then I scripted the events while following Jeremy Hight's original story as source."

"The purpose of the game in the early stages of Ethan's life attempts to re-create a sense of repetitive drudgery where everything comes down to similar boring tasks being carried out day after day. The game then attempts to convey the sense of struggle and hopelessness that the Ethan of the story must have felt as he wondered America from job to job, homeless, with no hope of success, and running away from himself. Towards the end of the game, it tries to convey a sense of regret by making the player think 'what if Ethan had made other choices?' That being said, the game (which can be completed in 30 minutes to 1 hour) is highly linear, as in its core what it is trying to do is convey in videogame form what was originally a short story by giving it a 16 bit JRPG aesthetic.


Johansen Quijano is currently teaching at the University of Texas at Arlington, where he is pursuing a Ph.D. with a focus on digital media, rhetoric, and composition. He holds a Bachelor's in Education, a Master's Degree in Curriculum and Development, and a Master's Degree in English. He has published on topics including video game studies, popular culture studies, and education. He has also participated in several media related projects including proofreading and testing on Super Nintendo translation projects and curricula revolving around the rhetoric of games. He is currently working on a series of games based on early literary texts.



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